Related captures from various sites & fan-sharing at EverythingLBH and LBH-soompi.com

Related updates here / here / here / here // EverythingLBH.com thanks every fan-sharing ardently with our utmost gratitude

Any queries or feedback, please direct them to Admin@EverythingLBH.com or PM us at our ELBH Facebook or LBH soompi forum // Thank you!

mrsun16_01.gif

August 31, 2018

Drama 'Mr. Sunshine' fuels popularity of retro parlance

Source: The DONG-A ILBO

5b886fcc0216d273824c.jpg

“’Love’ hago sip so (I desire love).” This was one of the many lines that can be found at a chat room on a Korean portal site where the viewers of Mr. Sunshine, a popular drama on tvN channel on August 19. The room quickly filled up with replies with old Korean expressions such as “Nado geureo hao (Same here),” “Ebeon saeng eun gleosso (Not a chance in this life).” Small chit-chats followed even during the drama was being aired. The content of replies varied, but they used the “hao” style at the end of each sentence. 

The viewer ratings of Mr. Sunshine surpassed the mark of 15 percent, according to Nielson Korea on August 19. The average viewing rate of those aged between 20 and 49, which are considered as the most critical viewers population, stood at 9.3 percent, beating all competitors with the same time slot. Popular dramas are naturally followed by a great scale of fan base. But there is something peculiar about the avid viewers of Mr. Sunshine. 

Set against the era of the Korean Empire, the show is fueling the popularity of retro style outfits and accessories. An increasing number of consumers are looking for “the enlightenment period look.” On-line shopping malls and rental shops of traditional Korean clothes are promoting their products on social media, hashtagging the name and the style of Go Ae-shin, the female lead of the show, which is played by Kim Tae-ri. 

In many Internet communities, people leave comments to identify the brand of hairbands worn by Kudohina, a Japanese character in the show played by Kim Min-jung. Those items were all shown in the drama as part of a product placement advertisement, also known as PPL. In fact, many people leave comments attesting to their first personal purchase of traditional Korean clothes. In an Internet community frequented by male consumers, tips are being shared on how to grow a beard like Kim Hui-sung, a male character played by Byun Yo-han in the show. Auction, an online shopping mall in Korea, announced that the amount of sales of retro fashion and daily times, such as pearl necklaces and traditional purses, has soared as much as five times year-on-year. 

Kyu-Jin Shin newjin@donga.com

July 21, 2018

MR SUNSHINE & Product Placement of 21st Century Brands in late 19th Century Choson/Korea

By AECHJAY.com

mrsun_ppl1.jpg

All Korean dramas rely on product placement. The concept of product placement, or PPL as they abbreviate in Korea, isn’t new, and of course, it doesn’t originate in Korea. Embedded marketing in media can be traced back to as early as the late 19th century starting with novels. In terms of visual media, the US (surprise surprise) included cars (Ford, Plymouth, Chevy, Packard), beverages (Coca-Cola) and cigarettes (Marlboro) in early studio films–some as early as 1916.

The tradition of conspicuous brand placement continued into television, of course. Entire shows would be sponsored by brands.

But this all changed with Sylvester (Pat) Weaver at NBC in 1949 (fun fact: Pat Weaver is Sigourney Weaver’s dad!). Weaver shifted the operation of network television by ensuring that programs get controlled by the network and ad time get purchased by companies through commercial breaks. BOOM. This turned the table completely. Companies were now at the mercy of networks and popular programs. This relationship continues to this day.

The difference in Korea is that commercial interruptions do not pervade the show as frequently as they do in American TV. An entire program can run without an ad break in the middle. (The downside is a prolonged series of ads in between separate programs; but this is also changing with the growth of cable in Korea.) Thus, product placement still plays a major role in a series production. And it’s not just one brand that owns the entire show. Multiple companies sponsor the show (percentages of how much screen time each product gets and the frequency of the product varies).

Writer Kim Eun-sook’s earliest major hit is Lovers in Paris (SBS, 2004). I can still remember the characters going to Baskin Robbins to eat a ton of ice cream and I recall the Soo-hyuk (Lee Dong-gun) telling the Tae-young (Kim Jung-eun) how many songs he has in his MP3 player. In Descendants of the Sun (KBS, 2016), they eat ton of Subway sandwiches and those ginseng squeeze packs; Song Hye-kyo wears a lot of Laneige lipstick and she keeps lighting that freaking 2S candle. We saw the same level of conspicuous product placement in Goblin. I watched that show multiple times already not so much because I think the storyline is the greatest thing since sliced bread but more so because the fashion, jewelry and makeup are such wonderful eye candy. Of course, Goblin had a lot of PPL from perfume to handbags, lipstick to Subway sandwiches to fried chicken to furniture to beverages. Both Descendants of the Sun and Goblin had a go-to meeting spot for emotionally draining meetings between lovers and it is Dal.komm Coffee.

Cafes become a natural PPL strategy because so many K-drama storylines include one-on-one meetings at cafes. It only makes sense that a cafe be included as part of the production so why not make it a sponsor? Makes sense in terms of business. All that is well and good but how do you cram in contemporary brands into a show that is set in Choson the same year as the Gabo Reform?

Korean audiences are savvy, and they’re already talking about it. In fact, a number of them are saying that the PPL in Mr. Sunshine is non-disruptive. Viewers are expressing their appreciation for the slick embedded marketing that the show makers have worked into this period piece.

But product placement is never not noticeable. In fact, the beat that show takes when they are about to take a moment for their sponsors is very detectable. When Eugene Choi (Lee Byunghun) raises his Odense teacup in the middle of his quiet meditation looking out his window, he makes an observation that is out of character: “Is this style of teacup in fashion now?” Like, dude, you’re a former slave boy/orphan/Korean American military man. Since when do you give a richard simmons about trending chinaware? Let’s be real.

Paris Baguette is very obviously a sponsor. We know this because it is one of the first banner bumpers to appear when the end credits roll, but we also know this because in episode 2, its characteristic blue and white label appears where lady Ae-shin (Kim Tae-ri) makes a stop to enjoy some sweets. (The sign posts and lamps all read, “French Bakery.”) In fact, Paris Baguette is currently selling special Mr. Sunshine specialty goods. 

mrsun13_00.gif

And what would a K-drama be without a cafe/coffee sponsor? Dal.komm makes, perhaps, the most obtrusive display in Mr. Sunshine. Not only do the characters really push this ??/gabe (Choson lingo for “coffee”) stuff but the napkins and even background sign straight up reads “Dal.komm Coffee.”

Hey. It’s all good though. No need to get all worked up over how a show takes us “out of the moment.” That sort of thing is nonsense. The nature of TV is self-reflexivity. We as audiences couldn’t possibly believe that late 19th century Korea had a guy named Eugene Choi acting as a military representative of America. So eye-roll all you want. PPL in Korean dramas aren’t going anywhere. Not even in a period piece.

In fact, given how SVOD streaming companies such as Netflix and Amazon don’t have commercial breaks as part of their distribution operation, product placement is now an integral part of their original episodes. In this way they are taking influence from K-drama productions and their business strategy.

Seeing as we TV lovers don’t simply rely on broadcast and cable television to receive our shows but also subscription to digital streaming, our lives will now be dictated by both commercial interruptions and embedded marketing in the programs. And that’s what I realized while working out at the gym yesterday. The absurdity of capitalism and our addiction to TV has turned us all into a bunch of suckers. Wait, I mean, “consumers.” 

mrsun_ppl2.jpg

Credit: themisung (there's a clip as well)




Tweet



Go back to everythingLBH.com